08202017Headline:

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Mike Myers
Mike Myers
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Use Of Forensic Evidence In Sport And Personal Injury Cases

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A French official said that Floyd Landis’ doping samples contained synthetic testosterone — indicating the substance came from an outside source.

The announcement came after a second doping test came up positive earlier Saturday. The American Tour de France champion responded by saying he “never taken any banned substance” and that he won because he “was the strongest man” in the race.

The International Cycling Union announced in Paris that tests on the backup urine sample from the race have turned up the same result as the original — elevated levels of testosterone.

Landis faces the loss of his title and a two-year ban from the sport. The ban would come from USA Cycling, which is responsible for sanctions against the American rider.

The same type of blood testing is often used in personal injury cases. The most common use is in motor vehicle accident cases where there is an allegation that a person is intoxicated either because of using drugs or alcohol.

Sometimes these tests are conducted in conjunction with a DUI investigation. Othertimes they are conducted by a medical examiner as part of an autopsy.

For answers to your questions, ask a personal injury attorney.